My KonMari Journey: Clothes and Books

My KonMari journey began last summer, after several friends urged me all spring to give it a try. I liked the idea of decluttering by category versus room as well as going from easy (clothes), gradually working our way up to hard (sentimental items).

Before jumping in though, I checked out some YouTube videos on the subject. I especially enjoyed watching Lavendaire's video on organizing her closet:

I then found a fantastic KonMari checklist on Jersha & Dup's site and jumped in. Sometime between decluttering clothes and books, I purchased Marie Kondo's book, The Magical Art of Tidying UpIt was a very quick read.

KonMari Method Round 1: Clothes

Applying the KonMari Method on clothes was fairly easy. I believe it took me one or two weeks, most likely because I have done some decluttering on a yearly basis. However, this was the most aggressive decluttering that I have ever done.

Although Marie Kondo states to keep only what sparks joy, I stretched my criteria to include, "Items I Need for Work" and "Things that Make Me Feel Good." Everything that didn't meet this criteria was given away to family, friends, students, and charity. Let's just say I have quite a few Hero Cards from Value Village

I went by section off of Jersha & Dup's list, so one day, I tackled shirts. Next day, pants. It was illuminating to see just how many items I was hanging onto that no longer fit or I simply hadn't worn for years. After some heavy duty KM-ing, I had tons of room in my closet and dresser to give each item a proper home. 

I am pleased to say that one year later, everything generally goes back to their home when not in use. There is definitely a sense of belonging to see them placed in their allotted cubbyholes.

 This is the longest that my t-shirt drawer has ever been this organized.

This is the longest that my t-shirt drawer has ever been this organized.

 My parents picked up three of these units at a garage sale. Since they weren't using them, I snagged them to organize my purses, stuff in my craft room, and my winter gloves, scarves, etc.

My parents picked up three of these units at a garage sale. Since they weren't using them, I snagged them to organize my purses, stuff in my craft room, and my winter gloves, scarves, etc.

KonMari Round 2: Books and More Books

I didn't think that I was a huge bibliophobe, but I do have a sizeable personal and work-related book collection. It was impossible to get all my books (including music books) into one room for the discarding process, so again, I went in categories.

 This was the beginnings of my discarding phase in the music studio.

This was the beginnings of my discarding phase in the music studio.

 Some of the books that I let go of.

Some of the books that I let go of.

KMi-ing my book collection was also a Summer 2015 project. It wasn't particularly difficult to decide what to let go of. Yes, I let go of books I liked, but they weren't ones I liked enough to want to re-read in the short-term or books that I had re-read on a regular basis. 

My piano students and their parents got first crack at my book discards. Next, a friend who had opened a music school (Flamingo School of Music) went through it. Many of her students are either from low income families or just immigrated to Canada, so the donations were put to good use.

Next, I took books to the Calgary Public Library, then Calgary Co-Op's book sharing bin and Value Village. Sadly, some books weren't wanted by any of these places and wound up in recycling.

One year later, my personal book collection remains organized (with a special basket for books I'm borrowing). My music library remains a work in progress. I'm going to recruit my students to help me re-shelve the books after their lessons for coveted Maestro Bucks.

 My personal library - one year after getting the KonMari treatment.

My personal library - one year after getting the KonMari treatment.

Next time, I'll share my ongoing experiences with paper decluttering. It's been quite the journey - and it's not over yet! Here's a preview:

 Before he passed away, Maestro was quite the KonMari Supervisor. As you can see, he wasn't impressed with the amount of paper I had amassed.

Before he passed away, Maestro was quite the KonMari Supervisor. As you can see, he wasn't impressed with the amount of paper I had amassed.